Upcoming Training: Building with Compressed Earth Blocks

earth block building
Photo courtesy of EarthinBlock

Compressed Earth Blocks (CEB) are a sustainable construction option, using high pressure to create bricks from local soil and clay with only a tiny amount of cement. CEB eliminates the energy and pollution produced in the creation of bricks and cement blocks. In many areas CEB homes can replace wooden structures that are adding to the depletion of the world’s forests. Earth blocks are cheaper, greener and far more durable than concrete blocks or mud bricks. The stabilized blocks don’t melt in the rain so rebuilding isn’t necessary. 

Key components of this training include mixing ratios, the use of a compressed earth block machine to make bricks, and designing and constructing a naturally well-insulated and efficient earth block building.

earth block machine
The EarthinBlock machine is designed and manufactured in the U.S.A. by former NASA engineers. It weighs 2,000 pounds and can be towed. It can be easily moved around a building site or up the side of a mountain.

Hosted by Trees, Water & PeopleEarthinBlocks, and Lakota Solar Enterprises

Where: Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center, Pine Ridge, South Dakota

When: October 18-26, 2013

Registration and scholarship applications are due October 1st!

You must complete a registration form or scholarship application to be considered for this training.

We are honored to be able to offer three scholarships to female students for this training.

Trees, Water & People Renewable Energy Program

Photo of the Week: Leo White Bear

Photo of the Week: Leo White Bear of the Shoshone-Bannock tribe works hard to construct the roof of a new straw bale home at the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center (RCREC) on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Leo attended the recent Straw Bale Workshop to learn about sustainable housing building techniques and theory, and he was a huge help in constructing the straw bale demo home at RCREC.

Notes from the Field: Let’s stop talking and start doing

By Pete Iengo, TWP Office Manager & Volunteer Coordinator

August 9, 2011: Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota

We are on day two of the straw bale house construction.  There has been great progress, thanks to the seemingly endless enthusiasm and energy of the TWP volunteers, Re-Member crew, Northern Cheyenne Reservation trainees, as well as many friends and family of Henry Red Cloud.

Birch Hincks, TWP's Tribal Lands Intern, works hard building a frame for the straw bale house.

This progress is in spite of a daunting thundershower that rolled through at about 10am today.  It looked as though the storm could really hamper our progress.  However, the ominous soaker lasted about 40 minutes, and before I knew it the crew was back to work.  After the storm came a lot of humidity and some searing sunshine.  It was definitely a stark reminder of Mother Nature’s power, the harsh year round conditions here on the reservation, as well as the great power of human will.

This is a very diverse and determined group, and while there are different motivations coursing through the project, there is a common thread that has become clear; let’s stop talking and start doing something to help people improve their lives.

By the end of work today we will have a complete roof, and the door and window frames will be in place.  Also, the foundation will be secured to the straw bale stacks with a simple but effective wood slat and bale string system.  With the structure of the house securely in place we are ready to have a plaster party!  All day participants have been sifting the clay to a fine powder, in preparation of the mixing process.  The clay stucco solution is the glue that will unite the house structurally and is going to be applied tomorrow.  Henry has been jesting about tomorrow’s Plaster Party all day, keeping things light.  In the days following we will add the finishing touches.

Flip through the time-lapse photos below to see a days worth of construction on the new straw bale house.

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You can donate to this project by clicking here!